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WHEN THE WRITING IS ON THE WALL IN BOLD TYPE FONT.. Jim Tressel has resigned as head coach at...

WHEN THE WRITING IS ON THE WALL IN BOLD TYPE FONT.. Jim Tressel has resigned as head coach at Ohio St. Luke Fickell will serve as interim head coach for the 2011 season and a search for a new head coach will commence following the season. Or perhaps, it would be more appropriate to say that Tressel was "resigned" by the university, according to the Columbus Dispatch who first reported the story. Naturally, we are most concerned with how this affects the Cornhuskers, right? 1) With the program now officially in disarray status - fired coach, interim coach, impending sanctions, player suspensions, who is the new coach - how does this affect their chances in next year's matchup in Lincoln? 2) Does Bo become a target again? The name being thrown out the most this morning is Urban Meyer, but we've a year to wait. If NU lights it up in its first tour around the Big 10, does Pelini become an option to come home and fix the Bucks with a decent rebuild job already under his belt at Nebraska?

``It's not going to be Coach Whipple,'' Golden told The Miami Herald on Friday when asked who would...

``It's not going to be Coach Whipple,'' Golden told The Miami Herald on Friday when asked who would be his next offensive coordinator. ``There will be a decision here pretty quickly. The NFL season closes Sunday and there is a lot of interest from people there. We should have our whole staff together in three to four days.''

Mark Whipple isn't staying in Miami. So, that's another name on the market. If Golden went with a NFL coach (McNulty? Rip Scherer?), that'd be one less team in competition for Frank Cignetti, although who knows what's going to happen with the coaching carousel continuing to spin. Update: from reading other reports, it really looks like I underestimated the effect that the looming threat of a lockout would have on NFL coaches' willingness to take college jobs this year.

None of its programs were profitable in the fiscal year ended 2009, according to the...

None of its programs were profitable in the fiscal year ended 2009, according to the school. Rutgers Athletic Director Tim Pernetti said attending bowl games helps him build his football program and neither he nor the conference wants to give them up. Instead, they’ll look more closely at expenses. "The best-case scenario is the payouts going up," Pernetti said in an interview. "But we also have to focus on keeping our budget tight and constantly look for ways to trim costs."

Those lines were from Curtis Eichelberger's bowl story today for Bloomberg. The piece works well as a case against the bowl system, especially coupled with all of the lackluster ticket sales around the country this year. If losing millions in revenue can't kill the BCS, nothing ever will. The Big East pooling revenue isn't exactly news though, and the line about "state subsidies" was poorly worded considering how little funds Rutgers University actually gets from New Jersey (20.8% as of this year, and has been in a steady decline for two decades).

"We offered one gentleman a position here. However, his father has a terminal illness, and he's...

"We offered one gentleman a position here. However, his father has a terminal illness, and he's gonna go home to New Jersey to be with his father."

Pittsburgh coach Mike Haywood on Rivals Radio, answering whether he wanted to retain any of the previous Panther staff. The quote comes from about 11:00 in.

Q: What are the more significant costs/investments involved in a move to FBS? A: Some of the more...

Q: What are the more significant costs/investments involved in a move to FBS? A: Some of the more significant costs/investments involved in a move to FBS would include: • Improvements to our on-campus football practice/training facilities. The cost of upgrading practice facilities is preliminarily estimated at $35 million (for physical improvements only). • Operational costs involved in an FBS move (above our current net expenditures), such as additional salaries, marketing, and ongoing facility maintenance. Because of competing institutional priorities, many of these investments would need to be fully funded through private gift support from donors. We are conducting financial analyses as well as a feasibility study to assess the implications of such private gift support–especially in terms of opportunity costs. That is, we are seeking to understand if donor support for football initiatives could preclude support for other initiatives at the university; and if so, how and to what extent.

Villanova's president wrote a candid letter today about their football program's potential upgrade to the FBS level. In spite of these daunting financial concerns, Donohue acknowledges that their hand might be forced with so much power and influence being concentrated in the "Big Six" conferences. I think with all the obstacles standing in the way of an upgrade that it probably won't happen in the end.

In a similar vein, the median institutional subsidy for athletics in the FBS rose from around $8...

In a similar vein, the median institutional subsidy for athletics in the FBS rose from around $8 million in 2007-8 to more than $10 million in 2008-9. This reliance on institutional funds has increased as the growth in median revenue generated directly by athletics programs in the FBS — via sources such as ticket sales and media contracts — slowed to nearly 6 percent from 2008 to 2009. This is down significantly from the 17 percent growth in revenue from 2007 to 2008. By comparison, total athletics expenses sped in the other direction, ballooning by nearly 11 percent. This is double the growth in expenses from 2007 to 2008.

According to the NCAA, only 14 FBS athletic departments made a profit in 2008-2009, down from 25 only a couple of years ago. This graphic is really telling. Men's football and men's basketball are the only athletic department programs that make a profit on average, with women's basketball generating the largest loss. According to the report "60 percent of teams have generated such surpluses in each of the past six years".

From top to bottom, the Big East is as strong as any conference in the country, when you look at...

From top to bottom, the Big East is as strong as any conference in the country, when you look at the eight teams and how competitive it is each and every week. - Randy Edsall, yesterday to ESPN. Randy Edsall was (gasp) right. Kevin from The UConn Blog takes issue with Holly Anderson's silly dismissal of Edsall's comments. He does a very good job in dispensing with some plain factual errors, but I want to go a step further. Edsall was absolutely correct in all respects. The key phrase here being "From top to bottom". Thereby, if you take a mean average of the eight Big East teams, that mean team would compare favorably to a mean average team from other conferences. This fact is evidenced by the Big East's #2 finish in last year's Sagarin ratings (the Big East has not finished in last place since expanding back to full strength in 2005). Certainly, no Big East team would have stood a chance against Alabama last year, being the national champion and absolute cream of the crop of the SEC. Middle of the pack though, that's a different story, as the fifth place Big East team in UConn comfortably blew out South Carolina in their bowl matchup. When it comes to the SEC mean, Florida counts the same as Vanderbilt. Once you look around the country and see how few teams are willing to play quality OOC schedules, there isn't really much of substance left to Holly's shoddy argument.

6. Duke. Awful doesn't begin to describe the enormity of the situation. The high school stadium....

6. Duke. Awful doesn't begin to describe the enormity of the situation. The high school stadium. The coaching graveyard. The utter despair.

Opinion: Breaking down six worst BCS programs - College football- nbcsports.msnbc.com Bwahahahaha! Duke Football -- a joke that is so bad it almost isn't funny.

The state of Florida has more non-BCS programs — Central Florida, Florida Atlantic, Florida Inter...

The state of Florida has more non-BCS programs — Central Florida, Florida Atlantic, Florida International and South Florida — than BCS schools, and three of them went bowling last season. The Sunshine State is just one major program away from being able to form its own conference that is as large, and certainly more competitive, than the Big East.

Walters: Non-BCS conferences, Independents preview - College football- nbcsports.msnbc.com Heh. I just got a big laugh out of the idea that the state of Florida alone could form a more competitive conference than the entire Big East.
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